Outsourcing vs Offshoring: Which is better?

“Outsourcing” and “offshoring” are buzzwords in business, but how they differ remains unclear to many. An Asian talent boom and an increasing need for IT and competent software engineers in the Western world are driving the use of these terms.

Although both models share similar characteristics, they are still very different. So, when comparing outsourcing vs offshoring, which is better? In this piece, we compare the advantages and disadvantages of each model.

Outsourcing vs offshoring: A brief history
Outsourcing

In the 1990s, companies began outsourcing support functions to third parties so that they could focus on their core business. Companies without internal competencies would often opt for this approach. It could be argued, however, that this approach was more helpful for companies looking to grow quickly and increase their profits rather than for those attempting to increase efficiency and boost innovation.

Offshoring

Offshoring emerged at the turn of the 20th century, soon after outsourcing’s popularity faded. As expectations began to rise, organisations wanted greater control over their operations.

As a result, organisations began looking for a business model with cost-efficiency, scalability, and complete control. This novel approach allowed companies to build dedicated teams from a scalable talent pool, in a different geographical location, under the same management.

The key benefits of both models
Sales and manufacturing have slowed because of a talent shortage in the West. This has further popularised these models. When comparing outsourcing vs offshoring, we see both have their advantages. Let’s look at a few.

Outsourcing

Flexibility
Cost-effectiveness
Resources
With outsourcing organisations can focus on core competencies by delegating other functions to a third party. Flexibility is also one of the key advantages of outsourcing. You can manage an offshore finance team for a few hours or days. And outsourcing is usually a cost-effective business model because infrastructure and administration costs are almost eliminated

Offshoring

Ownership
Talent
Cost-effectiveness
Scalability
Offshore businesses have access to a large talent pool. In an offshore business model, the company controls its core business. Software developers and producers face enormous pressure in developed countries to find and recruit individuals with the proper skill set.

Offshoring is undoubtedly driven by more than cost-savings. It gives organisations the chance to access this talent without incurring high costs at home due to the lower cost of living.

Building offshore teams allow companies to establish remote centres around the world. The result is that they can scale their business, providing support wherever and whenever clients need it.

The disadvantages of both models
This is all well and good, but when examining outsourcing vs offshoring closely, what are the apparent disadvantages of both models?

Outsourcing

Loss of control
Hidden costs
Lack of customer focus
When a company outsources, it loses some control over the quality. Poor communication and visibility could result. Companies must also be prepared for any hidden costs vendors might charge them later when outsourcing.They often end up paying more than their initial agreement because the work is outside the scope of the initial contract.

Offshoring

Geographic distance
Working with a team in a different time zone can be challenging. Implementing tools and procedures poorly can also lead to delivery delays. An offshore partner can ensure the collaboration method is implemented correctly by working with their partner closely.

Outsourcing vs offshoring: who wins?
Offshoring and outsourcing both have advantages and disadvantages. Outsourcing is usually the most practical option for short-term projects that only last up to a few weeks.

However, offshoring may be the right option if you want to start from scratch. It may be challenging, but you can work with a team you trust that can provide invaluable guidance.

Commercial Loans – Take All Aspects In Consideration

As the saying goes, taking a loan is easier than surviving with it. A shrewd businessman is one who borrow but with an eye to repay it as soon as possible. Sometimes, business requirements arise because you get a new business order hat is hard to manage within your own business funds. You obviously cannot afford to lose big business opportunity only because the funds are not there.

These and other similar situations force you to take help of external sources of financing. These sources may be temporary or permanent, depending on the nature of funding. Large body corporate often have huge financial needs, and therefore, they resort to public financing by inviting deposits or going for a ‘rights issue’ meant for the existing shareholders. On the other hand, a new business concern or sole proprietorship undertaking would obviously not be able to take benefit of that sort – neither are these meant for them.

Before applying for commercial loans, first of all decide the type of debt financing that your business firm will be comfortably able to get. If you do not own any property in the name of firm, secured commercial business loans are out of question. You will have to rely on loans that do not require any security. These loans will offer you a limited amount – upto £25,000. The interest rate is likely to be little more than what you can get by pledging some property. The amount of loan that you can qualify for can be increased by involving some property in the loan transaction.

Why an Integrated Workplace Safety and Wellness Program Is Best

Employees are a business’s most valuable asset and keeping them safe and healthy should be a priority for any company. Many businesses have a workplace safety program and a wellness program, but the two programs operate independently of one another – but should they? There are some compelling reasons to integrate the two so that employees can benefit from a more global, holistic approach to staying safe and healthy on the job.

To adequately address health and safety issues, companies need to look not only at whether an employee is performing their job safely but whether they’re healthy and fit enough to do their job without a high risk of injury. Issues like obesity, poor physical fitness and inadequate nutrition make it harder for employees to carry out certain tasks in the workplace.

The link between health and safety

According to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, people who are obese are at higher risk for occupational health issues and injuries. When obese staff are exposed to chemicals on the job, they’re at higher risk for occupational asthma and heart and lung issues compared to a non-obese person. They’re also at greater risk for ergonomic issues and bio-mechanical problems including carpal tunnel syndrome. If companies focus on workplace safety without addressing the obesity issue, the bigger problem remains. A unified approach that integrates occupational safety measures with wellness initiatives that emphasize good nutrition and weight control provides a more effective solution to the problem.

There’s also the issue of back injuries. Back injuries are one of the most common workplace safety issues, and people who are overweight and physically unfit are at higher risk for injuring their back on the job. Most back injuries occur as a result of lifting objects at work and ergonomic issues. Although it’s not possible to prevent all work-related back problems, integrating wellness with safety by emphasizing regular exercise to strengthen muscles in the lower back can reduce back injuries. Integrating workplace safety and wellness offers a more well-rounded approach to preventing back injuries.

What part does wellness play in safety? Wellness programs that focus on stress reduction, smoking cessation and alcohol and drug-related issues are also important for workplace safety. According to a study published in a Canadian publication called The Daily, smokers are at greater risk for being injured at work compared to non-smokers. Among women, the risk was nearly double. Stress does more than just affect employees psychologically – it increases their risk of being injured on the job. Employees who are under stress at home or at work are distracted and less able to focus on doing their job safely. Integrating stress management into a workplace safety program can help reduce the number of injuries and motivate employees to be more productive. Nutrition is another factor that a workplace safety and wellness program should address. Employees who start their day with only a cup of coffee are more prone to blood sugar drops that can lead to workplace injuries. Good nutrition is an integral part of any safety program.

There’s another benefit of merging wellness and workplace safety. Employees are less likely to participate in programs that address workplace hazards than they are wellness programs that focus on personal benefits. Integrating the two makes it more likely that employees will take part.

The bottom line

Combining workplace safety with wellness has a number of benefits for both employees and employers. Most importantly, it helps to create a safer, healthier and more productive workplace – and that’s something every company should strive for.